The Only Routine You Need To Restore Full Overhead Mobility

Break down barriers and gain strength in minutes!

David Liira, Kin.

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Image from Kampus Production on Pexels

Shoulder mobility is one of the most overlooked aspects of health and fitness. That is until you lose it. From collegiate athletes to elderly populations, I’ve seen virtually everyone struggle in this area and it all comes down to one crucial mistake. We’ve forgotten how to properly recruit the muscles around the shoulder girdle and it’s leading to compensation at the back, hips, and other tissues that are already overworked.

Shoulder mobility has the power to make or break your form in the gym, and keep you active throughout your day instead of being sedentary. While many people overlook this training entirely, it’s an incredibly simple practice that virtually anyone can do, regardless if you have prior gym experience or any knowledge of anatomy.

Today I want to introduce three movement patterns that can assist in opening up your shoulder and thoracic area. This will help decrease your daily bodily stiffness while allowing you to deeply understand why good mobility and a long health span are so connected.

It’s never too early or too late to begin investing in your shoulder health, so why not get started today?

Unleash Your Mobility To Optimize Health

Please keep in mind that if you have a history of serious shoulder/spinal injuries or chronic conditions that may put you at risk during exercise, talk to a trusted health provider before implementing any of the movements below. While these exercises are accessible to most populations, it’s always a good idea to be certain that you’re ready for them.

As with all of my programs, be patient, listen to your body, and never go beyond a 3–10 on the pain scale. If you’re experiencing problems with a certain movement, take a break and come back to it another time. For the best results, try this routine at least 3–4 times per week. Ideally, fit it into your schedule every day to boost productivity and lower bodily aches and pains. As always, if you need personal modifications for any exercise, let me know in the comments and I’ll get back to you as soon as I can!

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David Liira, Kin.

Kinesiologist. Writing on health and the human condition. Clap and I clap back. https://www.davidliirakin.com